A friend and I were searching all day and found (after going to 3 different hills) what we think may be an 1866 Krieg camp or skirmish area. In about an hour and a half we found 12 unfired mini-balls and five fired ones. These are a few of my favorite earlier finds. The sword was my first and only sword find. It is a hunters sword dating from about 1700 and I found it on a hill overlooking the LTA (local military training area) next to an old house foundation. On the same ridge I also found a silver Prussian 1800s coin and a few other 1700s copper coins. I also found a very nice iron gothic spur dating from the mid 1300s and a baurnwehr - 1500s hunters knife. The hunting knife was my first "good" find that I found in an area that had been hunted several times by a German friend of mine. Needless to say, I was very excited when I found it.

1500's hunters knife.
1500's hunters knife.

1300's iron gothic spur.
1300's iron gothic spur.

1700's hunters sword.
1700's hunters sword.

The y-shaped hardware attached to the heel by straps, the spur was one of the essential tools a knight possessed as an equestrian, and they became on of the dominant symbols of knighthood. Prior to the late 13th century simple "prick" type spurs were in wide use, but during the last two decades of the 13th century and into the 14th the "rowel" spur gained wide popularity.

14th century rowel spurs had a shank ranging in length from two to more than nine inches, with a flared tongue that allowed the spur to ride up the ankle slightly without causing discomfort. Made of bronze, brass and iron, these spurs were probably both cast and forged, depending upon the preferences of the craftsman. Rowels were generally sharp wheels, sometimes decorated with fascinating piercework patterns. 15th century spurs were generally much the same, but during the 16th century the shanks were shortened and more spikes added to the rowel.

Spurs were generally attached to the foot with one strap running under the foot and other over the foot, these straps affixed to the spur itself by metal clips that had rings at the other end passing through a hole at the apex of each fork of the "Y" shape. The underside strap was generally made in one piece while the spur was fastened into place in top of the foot using a decorative buckle.